THE TECHNICAL BID SPECIALISTS

    Focused on winning. Since 1980

Sales proposals need seven inputs to win

 

Sales proposal writing must shine

Sales proposal writing must always shine with brilliant inputs from seven discrete activities - for the best chance of uncompromised success. Proposal writing for a new contract opportunity is usually the job of a graduate engineer.  He or she will produce a bid document to meet the filing deadline.  Itís often a lonely thankless task. But it neednít be like that.

First, the boss should supervise developing a cunning competitive strategy, and lead total quality management. Great strategy and great quality reflect a great boss. Then the financial manager must devise and contribute a fiercely competitive financial package.  The HR manager must present the team so that their competence, dedication and efficiency cannot be questioned.

Proposal writing must convince
The business development manager must explain convincingly how the company was set up just for this type of contract.  The marketing manager must contribute outstanding skills in sales communication, persuasion, document editing, illustrating and formatting.  The R&D manager must describe how the company has come by unique abilities and resources that will wow bid evaluators. This leaves the engineer to demonstrate brilliance at design, estimating, production, project management, H&S and reporting.

These managers (the ďMagnificent SevenĒ) should each consider constant innovation in sales proposal writing as a key responsibility.  Arenít they all there to see that the customer gets total satisfaction?  And bid evaluators may well wear seven hats to scrutinise the seven inputs.

Finally, an independent proposal writing quality expert is best placed to rapidly spot and correct weaknesses that compromise Best Practice.

BOTTOM LINE:   When the sales proposal writing process is set up professionally and applied to each bid so that EVERY manager is involved, contributing excellence, overall confidence in success should rapidly climb.


(c) This Opinion by Tom Evison was first published by Tecads in August 2012